INDIA’S 1st LUNAR PROBE CHANDRAYAAN-1 .

July 30, 2020 By Swapnil Suryawanshi

Chandrayaan-1

22 Oct 2008 – 28 Aug 2009

Chandrayaan-1 was the first Indian lunar probe under Chandrayaan program. It was launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation in October 2008, and operated until August 2009. The mission included a lunar orbiter and an impactor. 

Launch date: 22 October 2008OperatorIndian Space Research OrganisationOrbital insertion: 8 November 2008Orbits: 3,400 at EOMRocket: PSLV-XL C11Reference systemLunar orbit.

Mission duration‎: ‎Planned: 2 years; Final: 10 …Payload mass‎: ‎105 kg (231 lb)Launch mass‎: ‎1,380 kg (3,040 lb)Dry mass‎: ‎560 kg (1,230 lb).

Mission typeLunar orbiter
OperatorIndian Space Research Organisation
COSPAR ID2008-052A
SATCAT no.33405
Websitewww.isro.gov.in/Spacecraft/chandrayaan-1
Mission durationPlanned: 2 years
Final: 10 months, 6 days
Spacecraft properties
Launch mass1,380 kg (3,040 lb)
Dry mass560 kg (1,230 lb)
Payload mass105 kg (231 lb)
Start of mission
Launch date22 October 2008, 00:52 UTC
RocketPSLV-XL C11
Launch siteSatish Dhawan Second Pad
ContractorISRO

Why did Chandrayaan 1 fail :

Almost 300 days into the mission, ISRO lost connect with Chandrayaan 1 on 28th Aug, 2009. Reasons like failure of star sensors, improper thermal shielding and overheating were quoted for the abrupt loss of communication of a mission that was planned for 2 years.

Did Chandrayaan 1 landed on moon :

Chandrayaan1 launched on Oct. 22, 2008, from the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota, India, aboard a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle rocket, according to NASA. It reached the moon on Nov. 8, 2008.

Is Chandrayaan 1 success or failure :

With the successful completion of this operation, India became the fifth nation to put a vehicle in lunar orbit. First Lunar Orbit Reduction Manoeuvre of Chandrayaan-1 was carried out on 9 November 2008 at 14:33 UTC. During this, the engine of the spacecraft was fired for about 57 seconds.

PSLV C11 carrying Chandrayaan-1

What is the purpose of Chandrayaan 1 :

Chandrayaan1, the first Indian deep space mission, was launched to orbit the Moon and to dispatch an impactor to the surface. Scientific goals included the study of the chemical, mineralogical and photogeologic mapping of the Moon.

Is Chandrayaan 1 still working :

ISRO’s Chandrayaan1 was launched in 2008. It was considered lost till NASA scientists found it. … Scientists at the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) lost contact with Chandrayaan1. Now, scientists at NASA have successfully located the spacecraft still circling some 200 kilometres above the lunar surface.

Spacecraft properties
Launch mass1,380 kg (3,040 lb)
Dry mass560 kg (1,230 lb)
Payload mass105 kg (231 lb)
Start of mission
Launch date22 October 2008, 00:52 UTC
RocketPSLV-XL C11
Launch siteSatish Dhawan Second Pad
ContractorISRO
End of mission
Last contact28 August 2009, 20:00 UTC
Orbital parameters
Reference systemSelenocentric
Semi-major axis1,758 kilometers (1,092 mi)
Eccentricity0.0
Periselene altitude200 km (120 mi)
Aposelene altitude200 km (120 mi)
Epoch19 May 2009

History :

Prime minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee announced the Chandrayaan 1 project on course in his Independence Day speech on 15 August 2003. The mission was a major boost to India’s space program. The idea of an Indian scientific mission to the Moon was first mooted in 1999 during a meeting of the Indian Academy of Sciences. The Astronautical Society of India (ASI) carried forward the idea in 2000. 

Objectives :

The mission had the following stated objectives :

  • to design, develop, launch and orbit a spacecraft around the Moon using an Indian-made launch-vehicle
  • to conduct scientific experiments using instruments on the spacecraft which would yield data:
    • for the preparation of a three-dimensional atlas (with high spatial and altitude resolution of 5–10 m or 16–33 ft) of both the near and far sides of the Moon
    • for chemical and mineralogical mapping of the entire lunar surface at high spatial resolution, mapping particularly the chemical elements magnesium, aluminium, siliconcalcium, iron, titaniumradonuranium, and thorium
  • to increase scientific knowledge
  • to test the impact of a sub-satellite (Moon Impact Probe – MIP) on the surface of the Moon as a fore-runner for future soft-landing missions

Diagram of the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft